Carrot Seed Oil Uses and Benefits

While you may reach for carrots in your diet as a source of vitamins, beta-carotene, and fiber, using carrot seed essential oil topically or through a diffuser can provide many additional health benefits. Though not as widely used as other essential oils like lavender, lemon, or tea tree, carrot seed essential oil has many of the same benefits and brings its own unique scent and applications to the table. You may begin seeing carrot seed oil in beauty and skin care products to add moisture, reduce the appearance of wrinkles, and brighten the complexion. Before adding this health-boosting essential oil into your daily routine, it’s important to understand where it comes from, how it works, and how to use it safely and effectively.

What Is Carrot Seed Essential Oil?

Carrot seed essential oil, or daucus carota, is steam-distilled from the seeds and plant of the wild carrot, most commonly found in Europe or India. Wild carrots are not the same as the bright orange root we grow in our gardens and eat. Known as Queen Anne’s Lace, the wildflower was first introduced to North America from Europe as a medicinal herb. You’ve probably seen this plant growing on the side of the road in fields and meadows—it’s characterized by white, blue, pink, or purple flowers that look like the pattern on old lace. It grows a deep taproot underground.

You may also find many studies conducted on carrot seed oil, which is similar to the essential oil and is cold-pressed from the seeds. Studies such as the “Nutritional and Health Benefits of Carrots and Their Seed Extracts” focus on the pharmaceutical benefits of carrot seed oil indicate that the oil may be helpful in lowering cholesterol, improving cognitive functions, and performing as an antibacterial and anti-fungal agent. Most of these studies have not conducted been on humans, so you should always consult a medical professional before ingesting any kind of oil supplement. 

A third type of carrot oil, derived from the more familiar plant taproot that we eat, is rich in Vitamin A (beta-carotene) and is used like other plant oils in cooking. This type of oil is safe to eat. But according to Aromatherapy Science: A Guide for Healthcare Professionals, it is not interchangeable with carrot seed oil or essential oil and is not suitable for the uses described below.

It’s important to know which type of oil you are purchasing, as properties and benefits vary across the three types. As with all essential oils, make sure to seek out those produced from organic vegetables and plants from a sustainable, reliable source. All essential oils produced by GuruNanda are extracted using gentle distillation methods. They are 100 percent pure and natural—we never add or remove anything—and sent to customers with love and care.

Benefits and Uses of Carrot Seed Essential Oil

Carrot seed essential oil has many benefits due to its antiseptic, antioxidant, carminative (flatulent-reducing), and diuretic (urine-stimulating) properties. You can use it in a diffuser or combine it with other essential and carrier oils to apply topically. Using essential oils is a great way to move toward a more organic, plant-based lifestyle that is less reliant on toxic chemicals and non-sustainable materials and practices. Here we explore some of the many ways you can add this oil into your life.

One typical use of carrot seed essential oil is in aromatherapy. Diffusing essential oils through steam is an excellent way to absorb their fragrant healing properties and create a calming or rejuvenating environment. Aromatherapy is a great addition to a meditation or yoga practice. It can keep stress at bay in the office while you’re working or add a pleasant scent to your home without the potentially toxic chemicals found in some air freshener products.

Carrot seed essential oil has a woody, earthy, herbaceous smell that has a cooling effect and may help balance emotions. It isn’t as overwhelmingly fragrant as other oils, so combining it with stronger, complimentary oils will help enhance its effects. Try adding a few drops to an oil diffuser along with cedarwood, sandalwood, or rosewood for a soothing fall or winter scent. It can help regulate mood swings and promote emotional stability.

Carrot Seed Oil for Wound Care

Carrot seed essential oil has antiseptic properties to fight against certain strains of bacteria and fungi. Applied topically, it may help in reducing infections on the skin or in minor wounds.

Try this recipe for a topical antiseptic for minor burns or cuts: Mix 5 drops of carrot seed oil with 1 tablespoon of calendula oil, 1 tablespoon of rosehip seed oil, and 1/4 teaspoon of vitamin E. (Recipe adapted from Essential Oils: Reference to Go: Simple Blends for Health and Beauty.)

You can also mix 5 drops of carrot seed essential oil into 1/4 cup of aloe vera gel for a soothing balm to apply to sunburn.

 Carrot Seed Essential Oil Skin Benefits

Antioxidants are substances that inhibit damaging oxidation in the body caused by free-radicals or agents. The most popular descriptor of an antioxidant is as an “anti-aging” ingredient, and carrot seed essential oil can be found in many skin care products to reduce wrinkles and other signs of aging. When ingested, antioxidants can also protect against liver and other cell damage. There have been no studies on the safety of ingesting carrot seed oil of the cold-pressed variety; carrot seed essential oil, as with other essential oils, should be applied only topically and never ingested without consulting a trained healthcare professional.

Carrot Seed Oil Can Moisturize Skin and Hair

Carrot seed essential oil is often added to facial lotions to improve moisture retention, reduce the look of tired skin, and help nourish dry areas. Using carrot seed essential oil in a face mask may help tighten and rejuvenate the skin look and feel, according to the Complete Aromatherapy Handbook. Consider mixing a few drops with a tablespoon of jojoba as a soothing morning face mask.

To help remove the appearance of dull, dry skin, try this DIY exfoliating face scrub:

Mix 5 drops of carrot seed essential oil with 1 ounce of argan oil and 2 tablespoons of turbinado or brown sugar to form a thick paste. Massage into facial skin, avoiding the sensitive skin around the eyes, and rinse gently with warm water. This scrub can also be used on lips to remove flakiness or stubborn, long-lasting lip color before applying lipstick.

Carrot seed essential oil also contains stimulant properties, which can be beneficial for the hair and scalp. Mixing a few drops with argan oil and massaging into the scalp for a few minutes can help promote healthy hair growth and moisture—just be sure to rinse it out thoroughly to avoid oily-looking roots.

Carrot Seed Oil Can Be Used as a Digestive Aid

As the holidays approach and we begin to overindulge in rich foods and drinks, our diets can wreak havoc on our digestive systems and cause a host of ailments, bloating, and discomfort. Carrot seed essential oil can help; its cleansing and diuretic properties make it a useful aid in digestion and combatting fluid retention. Combine a few drops with peppermint and ginger essential oils in an aromatherapy diffuser to help boost the liver and digestive system. Or mix a few drops into 1 ounce of castor oil and massage onto the belly in a clockwise direction to stimulate digestion after a large meal.

Where to buy 100% Pure Carrot Seed Essential oil?

Carrot Seed Oil If you’re ready to add this essential oil into your routine, GuruNanda therapeutic-grade carrot seed essential oil is produced from non-GMO plants sourced exclusively from India. We gently steam-distill the dried seeds and dried plant to extract the purest oil, with nothing added or removed. All of our products are tested in laboratories and contains no synthetics or additives.

As the popularity of and demand for essential oils grow, many companies are taking shortcuts to produce cheap imitation products that, at best, smell nice but have no therapeutic value, and at worst, may be harmful. Buying from a trusted source like GuruNanda ensures that you’re receiving a safe product and supporting a company that believes in ethical, sustainable practices.

Remember, when using oils on the skin, you should always mix the essential oil with a neutral carrier oil such as coconut, olive, or sesame. Many essential oils can be hazardous in large amounts; mixing with a carrier oil dilutes the essential oil and allows you apply it evenly. A good rule of thumb is to use 1 teaspoon of carrier oil for every 1 to 2 drops of essential oil.

While carrot seed essential oil is not known to be a skin irritant, a small patch test is advised. Mix 2 drops with 2 teaspoons of olive oil and dab on your inner wrist to determine your sensitivity to the product before applying to other areas of the body.

Essentials oils are generally safe for most people to use, but it is recommended that pregnant or nursing women, or anyone taking medications, consult a physician about possible side effects, interactions, or potential complications before using essential oils in any capacity. And topical use of essential oils, even in a carrier oil, is not recommended for children or infants due to the sensitive nature of their skin. It is also important to remember that essential oils should not be used to treat, cure, or diagnose any illness, disease, or injury without consulting or used under the supervision of a trained healthcare professional.


Resource List for Additional Information about Carrot Seed Oil

Arnold, Joan, and Gillerman, Hope. Essential Oils: Reference to Go: Simple Blends for Health and Beauty. Chronicle Books, 2012. https://books.google.com/books?isbn=1452122725

da Silva Dias, João Carlos. “Nutritional and Health Benefits of Carrots and Their Seed Extracts.” Food and Nutrition Sciences. Volume 5, Number 22. 2014 http://file.scirp.org/Html/5-2701422_52066.htm#txtF3

Fischer-Rizzi, Susanne. Complete Aromatherapy Handbook: Essential Oils for Radiant Health. Sterling Publishing Company, Inc., 1990. https://books.google.com/books?isbn=0806982225

Lis-Balchin, Maria. Aromatherapy Science: A Guide for Healthcare Professionals. Pharmaceutical Press, 2006. https://books.google.com/books?isbn=0853695784

New England Wildflower Society, https://gobotany.newenglandwild.org/species/daucus/carota/